Endocrine System


The endocrine system is a network of glands in your body that make the hormones that help cells talk to each other. They’re responsible for almost every cell, organ, and function in your body. If your endocrine system isn't healthy, you might have problems developing during puberty, getting pregnant, or managing stress. You also might gain weight easily, have weak bones, or lack energy because too much sugar stays in your blood instead of moving into your cells where it's needed for energy. That regulate metabolism, growth and development, tissue function, sexual function, reproduction, sleep, and mood, among other things.

The Glands Of The Endocrine System:




1. Hypothalamus:

The hypothalamus plays a significant role in the endocrine system. It is responsible for maintaining your body’s internal balance, which is known as homeostasis. To do this, the hypothalamus helps stimulate or inhibit many of your body’s key processes.

2. Pineal Gland:

The pineal gland was once dubbed the “third eye,” which originated for many reasons, ranging from its location deep in the center of the brain to its connection to light. Also, the French philosopher and mathematician RenĂ© Descartes was fascinated with the pineal gland. He even regarded it as the “principal seat of the soul, and the place in which all our thoughts are formed.” However, his observations have been widely rejected.

3. Pituitary Gland:

The pituitary gland is often dubbed the “master gland” because its hormones control other parts of the endocrine system, namely the thyroid gland, adrenal glands, ovaries, and testes. However, the pituitary doesn’t entirely run the show.

4. Thyroid:

The thyroid’s main role in the endocrine system is to regulate your metabolism, which is your body’s ability to break down food and convert it to energy. Food essentially fuels the body, and each of our bodies uses that fuel at different rates. This is why you often hear about some people having a “fast” metabolism and others having a “slow” metabolism.


5. Parathyroid:

The parathyroid glands are four small glands that have the sole purpose of secreting parathyroid hormone to regulate the calcium level in our bodies. The parathyroid essentially helps the nervous and muscular systems function properly. Calcium is the primary element that causes muscles to contract, and calcium levels are very important to the normal conduction of electrical currents along nerves.


6. Thymus:

The thymus gland will not function throughout a full lifetime, but it has a big responsibility when it’s active—helping the body protect itself against autoimmunity, which occurs when the immune system turns against itself. Therefore, the thymus plays a vital role in the lymphatic system (your body’s defense network) and endocrine system.

7. Adrenal:

The adrenal glands are two glands that sit on top of your kidneys that are made up of two distinct parts.
1. The adrenal cortex the outer part of the gland produces hormones that are vital to life, such as cortisol (which helps regulate metabolism and helps your body respond to stress) and aldosterone (which helps control blood pressure).
2. The adrenal medulla the inner part of the gland produces nonessential (that is, you don’t need them to live) hormones, such as adrenaline (which helps your body react to stress).

8. Pancreas:

The pancreas is unique in that it’s both an endocrine and exocrine gland. In other words, the pancreas has the dual function of secreting hormones into blood (endocrine) and secreting enzymes through ducts (exocrine). The pancreas belongs to the endocrine and digestive systems with most of its cells (more than 90%) working on the digestive side. However, the pancreas performs the vital duty of producing hormones most notably insulin to maintain the balance of blood glucose (sugar) and salt in the body. Without this balance, your body is susceptible to serious complications, such as diabetes.


9. Ovaries:

The ovaries are a pair of ova-producing organs (that is, they produce egg cells) that maintain the health of the female reproductive system. The ovaries, like their male counterpart, the testes, are known as gonads. This simply means they are the primary reproductive organs. In addition to their role in producing ova, the ovaries also have the distinction of being an endocrine gland because they secrete hormones primarily estrogen and progesterone that are vital to normal reproductive development and fertility.


10. Testes:

The testes (or testicles) are a pair of sperm-producing organs that maintain the health of the male reproductive system. The testes are known as gonads. Their female counterpart are the ovaries. In addition to their role in the male reproductive system, the testes also have the distinction of being an endocrine gland because they secrete testosterone a hormone that is vital to the normal development of male physical characteristics.






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